Viscon – Improving Engine Performance While Cutting Emissions

 

Viscon Internationalpic

Viscon International
Image: visconusa.com

A native of Armenia, Levon Termendzhyan guides Viscon International, Inc., which has developed a fuel additive that reduces the particulate matter and greenhouse gas emissions from diesel fuel. Levon Termendzhyan’s firm has brought to market a hydrocarbon polymer fuel additive.

The polymer was initially tested over 20 years ago at California’s China Lake missile sites and discovered to be a way to moderate the smoke, heat, size, and volatility connected with jet fuel explosions. The original polymer was altered to boost vehicle fuel combustion performance.

A key benefit of Viscon is its compatibility with the full range of spark ignition engines and compression ignition engines. Moreover, it can be safely used with any grade of diesel or gasoline fuel. Viscon also does not impact sensitive mechanisms such as oxygen sensors and catalytic converters. In addition, it is free of the alcohols and aromatics prevalent in many other fuel additive products, which could potentially damage your engine.

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The Science Behind Viscon’s Development as a Clean Energy Alternative

 

Viscon Internationalpic

Viscon International
Image: visconusa.com

Levon Termendzhyan serves as equity owner of Viscon International, a Bakersfield, California, company focused on promoting clean energy through a diesel fuel additive. Viscon is a candidate to help the state to meet its 2020 emissions reduction goals, following its certification and verification by the California Air Resources Board. Levon Termendzhyan and his team have developed Viscon as a non-toxic, food-quality, pure hydrocarbon polymer with a molecular structure that prevents it from contaminating groundwater.

A United States Department of Defense research project led to the development of the technology used to create Viscon. The original program focused on the production of polymers that would reduce the risk of dangerous explosions from jet engine fuel after a crash or tank rupture.

As this project expanded, researchers realized that these new substances could not only improve combustion but lower engine temperature, as well. Theoretically, these experimental polymers could even alter the physical properties and behavior of sprayed jet fuel.

Viscon, which has been in development for about two decades, represents a chemical hybrid of the original Department of Defense compound. Its base polymer is polyisobutylene, or PIB, which can be used for other commercial applications such as food additives and chewing gum. Viscon utilizes this polymer to modify the properties of fuel, making the additive a cost-effective, safe, and revolutionary way to make combustion more efficient.